Night Owl with a Day Job

We had our annual appointment with our hero neurologist yesterday.

Much of the appointment was spent discussing the importance of sleep.

Rose is a night owl.

She has a third-shift life while the rest of the world sleeps.

There is a kink in her schedule this summer.

She has a first-shift job.

Sleep deprivation is a seizure-provoker.

Rose cannot drive if she has another seizure.

A sleep-aid was prescribed.

Will she take it?

That’s up to Rose.

“Mama-Uber driver” would appreciate it.

Is Rose adult enough to make the best choice?

Old habits are hard to break.

I am hoping for wisdom and maturity.

We shall see.

Story # 18: Drug Changes Change Rose

Things fell apart. Drug 4L had been added to drug 3S after the seizures during the holidays. At first drug 4L made Rose mean. Getting her schoolwork done was a battle. Either she would not or could not concentrate. Were these changes due to the new drug, the new home bound situation, or the seizures? Her ear infections continued, so antibiotics were frequently in the mix.
We kept records of all her drug dosages and combinations, along with seizure descriptions on a chart. We couldn’t keep all of it straight unless we wrote it down. The months were a blur of seizures, side effects and sickness. I read books about epilepsy and researched epilepsy drugs and treatments. It was all so confusing. How could we help our Rose if we did not understand this disorder and the effects of its medications? I felt helpless and hopeless. Rose was changing as her drugs changed.
Appointments with the neurologist became very frustrating. The partner of the practice had left, so our doctor was handling a double load of patients. We used to feel like there was a set plan for Rose’s treatment; now it seemed like one long experiment. The doses for drug 4L kept increasing and we saw nothing but side effects. Her seizures became longer and stronger. We must have missed the window of effectiveness for drug 4L.       Finally it was dropped and drug 5Z was added to her doses of 3S. Experimenting with the wrong drugs and dosages went on for months. Every few days, Rose would have a long, strong seizure. She would spend a day or two recovering before another seizure knocked her back down. I did not leave her anymore. I was too scared.
Sometimes on the weekends when Rose’s dad was home, Rose’s brother would ride the trails through the woods around our house. I would go with him carrying my camera and a walkie talkie. If a seizure occurred, her dad could call me to come back. I would hike through the woods and allow myself to cry. This was the only time I would leave the house. I walked the paths in our woods relieved to be out of our sad house where the walls kept closing in.
I never let Rose see me cry. We did not want her to see us saddened or scared. We were losing her. Her essence was disappearing. She was a groggy, foggy, tired mess. The drugs were not helping anything. The seizures were wearing her down and the drugs were ruining the time in between them.

Seizure Mama speaks to parents:

I am ashamed to look at the records from these terrible months. Why did we not get a second opinion sooner? Why did we not demand to go to an EMU? The awful reason was that we thought going to the EMU was a big step toward surgery. I had read about the different surgeries that were used to stop seizures. I wanted to give every drug a full chance to work. When I look back at her charts of medication combinations now, I am horrified.
Drug changes were being made frequently and almost in a random fashion. I think the neurologist was on overload and was pushed to try things because of my constant calls and letters. She was seemingly experimenting with various possible remedies.
It took the terrible scare of Rose going toxic for us to decide that enough was enough and seek a second opinion from a different neurologist in a different city. That was a turning point for us. Don’t wait that long.

Let’s Talk About You

I have finished the book about Rose and me.

I have put all our stories down with the lessons we learned

while trying to balance a mean disease with a good life.

Now my goal is to find others who understand what it is like

to sort through the drugs and side effects to find the best mix.

Those who strive to live a happy, healthy life between seizures.

I am pleased to find strong, brave and optimistic survivors

not only carrying on but sharing their stories in real time.

You are everywhere.

Young folks like Kevin( Kevinskick) in Ireland, Laura ( Shake It Off; Living with Seizures),  Alec (Seize and Destroy) and  Yaelle ( Epilepsy at 23) in Israel are sharing their struggles.

Parents such as Clare of E-word and Dave of Epilepsy Dad are telling  how they help their children.

Then there are the parents who send comments like Lee Ann and Khadija that keep me going when I want to quit.

ALL of you inspire me to be stronger, braver and better.

We are a community. Brought together by a relentless disease.

You make me proud.

Seizure Mama/Flower

 

Story #4: First Drug Down

Drug “1T” was our first  drug. Now we knew that the cause of the seizures was always in Rose’s brain, not just showing up with fevers. It was a resident, not a guest. We were in a constant state of vigilance. I do not say this lightly. It would be a condition for us that still continued for decades, emergency-ready for twenty-four/seven. Rose nicknamed herself 24/7 because of this. We all tried to play this down, but it was what it was.
With the drug 1T, Rose became more active and hungry. She seemed hyper-emotional compared to her prior happy-go-lucky self. Was this change due to the new drug or an after-effect of the seizure? Her care-free childhood had transformed into a series of tests and medications and worried faces. There was a period of weeks after that long seizure in May that seemed like epilepsy was the center of our universe.
Our family planned a camping trip for mid-June. We hauled the boat and tent to a State Park for a week of fun. Our site was along the shores of a crystal-clear lake. Some friends with a daughter Rose’s age came to visit and spend a day with us out in our pontoon boat. Rose had a lot of fun on this trip. She made her own little play house inside a folded lawn chair. What an adventure.
Her dad and I had discussed what we would do if a seizure occurred during our stay here. We knew where the hospital was. We located the park office. There were officials around who could help, if needed. We made our plans in case of emergency. We had the bag phone. We were cautious, but brave.
During the night on Wednesday, I was awakened by unusual noises and motion beside me in the dark tent. I quickly switched on my flashlight. Rose was seizing. Her face and neck were covered in drool. Her skin looked splotchy. The seizure was short.
I lay back down on my sleeping bag, keeping a hand on Rose. I lay there thinking about what a crazy stupid mother I must be to have my baby here in the middle of nowhere, in a locked campground, in a tent, in the dark. This event was the beginning of one of my paranoid hopes of buying a house across the street from a hospital. That way we would always have medical help close-by.
When Rose awoke the next morning, she was scratching her neck. I pulled up her pajama top. A prickly red rash covered her torso and upper arms. Her lips were swollen. The bag phone was used to call her pediatrician. His diagnosis was that Rose had experienced an allergic reaction to the new drug, 1T.
Camp was broken. The tent was bagged up. Supplies were tossed haphazardly into the pontoon boat and the back of the truck. We headed back to civilization and supposed safety.
We stopped by the doctor’s office then pharmacy on the way home. This drug was not the right one. There were more to choose from. Lots more. Surely the next one would do the trick and stop the seizures without side effects. Seizures had been around for centuries. Surely there was an effective drug to fix this.

Seizure Mama speaks to parents:

A drug is a drug. It is a chemical compound, not a magic wand. It does what it does with the other chemicals in the body. Drugs are not dynamic substances. They work or they don’t. If a drug is not working, move on.
After trying several different drugs, we began to feel obligated to give each new drug more time. Determined to give each more chances than it probably deserved. We were afraid to damn each one for fear there was not a new drug waiting in the wings. Learn their names. Know their half-lives. Keep records of their effects and side-effects. When the evidence shows that the drug is ineffective, move to another or a new combination. Do not linger with a drug failure.
My charts of drugs and dosages, seizures and side-effects gave us confidence to move forward in terms of medications and treatments. It also eliminated “re-inventing the wheel” when we had to change doctors or go to a new clinic for tests.

Mary and her Damn Lamb

Rose was in the hospital for about a week due to her newly found kidney stones.

I stayed with her most of the time, only going home to shower and do laundry.

Days spent in the hospital are trying, but the nights are torture.

I had to sleep in a malfunctioning recliner beside Rose’s bed.

It would barely remain stretched out if you kept your back straight and applied force against it.  If you shifted the wrong way during the night, it shot into the sitting position, giving one quite a rude awakening.

Another issue that prevented a good night’s sleep was the nurse parade that came in at random times to check the IV machine.  If Rose moved to pinch the line an alarm  would sound.

None of these irritations compared with Mary and her Damn Lamb.

Across the hall was a patient who was not supposed to get out of bed, so the bed alarm was turned on.  Every time he got up, the bed played the tune of the children’s nursery rhyme “Mary had a Little Lamb.” This loud music alerted the nurses that the patient was being non-compliant.

Rose’s room was on the pediatric floor of the hospital. This story might make you smile, but there is a sinister twist to this tale.

While trapped in the hospital for days, I would silently slither out of Rose’s room while she slept to see different scenery and search for snacks. During one of my sneaky forays, I heard the nurses discussing this patient across the hall.

He was not a child. The hospital had no room for him in the Psych ward. Until a space opened up for him upstairs, he was across the hall from my Rose.

So every time I would hear “Mary had a Little Lamb”, I would wake up and watch Rose’s door; prepared to catapult myself from my dysfunctional recliner to protect my baby from some psycho.

Sleepless SEIZURE MAMA

 

Halloween in the Hospital

Story # 25 : Halloween in the Hospital

On October 27th Rose started vomiting. It continued for hours despite applications of the anti-nausea gel to her forearm. I finally packed her up and headed to the pediatrician’s office. He did not seem as alarmed as I was. He asked what I thought should be the next course of action. I replied that the next time Rose vomited, we were going to the emergency room. I told him that I knew something was really wrong with her. I did not know how I knew, but my “mama gut” was screaming. This doctor had known us for years now. He knew Rose’s history and he knew I was not an alarmist. He decided to send her on to the hospital to be admitted.
We were quickly checked in to a room. The nurses tried to start an IV. They could not get a needle in because Rose was so dehydrated. The IV supervisor was called to get one started. It was at this point that I realized that Rose’s face looked wrong. Her lips were too big and her eyes looked sunken. This is why I felt panicked. Her face was deflated due to dehydration.
The vomiting continued. They asked Rose her pain level on a scale of 1 – 10. She calmly replied 8. The nurses were startled by her response. She had not mentioned being in pain. She remained stoic through all the poking, prodding and x-rays. The suspected culprit was an intestinal blockage. To everyone’s surprise, two kidney stones were spotted. One was blocking a ureter. It needed to be removed immediately. A local urologist was called to perform the surgery on Halloween Eve.
When Rose heard that she was going to miss Trick-or-treating, she broke down. This brave ten-year-old patient boo-hooed like a baby. The nurses felt so sorry for her that candy and gifts began to show up in her room. Folks at our church were alerted. A giant bag of assorted candy was collected from the Trick-or-Trunk event. She got more candy than ever.

Seizure Mama Speaks Now

First, I would like to say that you must trust your “mama gut” even when you do not consciously know why you are alarmed. That instinct is like your hard drive. Even though the information is not on your “screen of consciousness” you still get a vibe of alarm. Even though I was not trained enough to know the signs of dehydration, I still recognized that something was physically wrong with Rose.

I would like to add that the following Halloween, Rose dressed up like a witch and delivered packs of candy to the pediatric floor of that hospital. The nurses were thrilled. They, of course, got to share in the spoils. Rose remembered how sad she was to miss Halloween. She wanted to make sure that the kids stuck in the hospital did not feel left out. This is what the seeds of pain can do. They can grow into love and bloom with kindness. Just like my Rose.

Toxic with a Timer

Story # 22: Toxic with a Timer

Rose’s latest drug combination became a recipe for disaster. She was dizzy and nauseated. She was limp and barely moved or responded. She was silent. She was being poisoned.
We put her on the couch, so that we could all keep an eye on her. She was on three drugs. One was an extended release form. One drug must have amplified the affects of the other two. Her nausea and vomiting turned to dry heaves and bile. Seizures were clustering. We knew she was in danger.
We called the on-call neurologist at about 11PM. The conversation was difficult due to the doctor’s foreign accent. My husband and I were both on the line listening. We thought the doctor said to use the emergency drug if Rose had another seizure. Then we were to take her to the Emergency Room if she had a seizure after that. Was that really what the doctor said? Two more seizures and then the ER? Really?
The next morning Rose was very pale, weak and listless. She barely moved. We tried desperately to get her to eat and drink each time that she woke up. She was fading before our eyes. I called the doctor’s office to report her condition. I broke down as I explained that we felt she was being poisoned by these three anti-convulsant drugs and still seizing.
The wise nurse calmly told us to get a timer. She said to set it for twenty minutes. Every time it went off, we were to wake Rose up and make her sit up and sip some water. We set and re-set the timer all day long. For hours we watched her and waited for the bell to ring, over and over.
Hours later she began to improve. The poison was being diluted. Rose was re-hydrating. The color came back in her face. She was safe. No trip to the Emergency Room required.

SEIZURE MAMA SPEAKS NOW

We kept gel in the refrigerator to put on Rose’s arm for nausea. There were several times when her vomiting lead to seizures because she had thrown up her medication. We always sifted through her vomit if it occurred soon after a dose. I know this seems gross, but you need to know whether a dose needs to be replaced or not. Doubling a dose may be worse that missing a dose. You need to know.
This particular situation was the exact opposite. Rose was sick and seizing before throwing up. Her dosages were too high. The combination was too much. She was listless and unresponsive. I still distinctly remember this because I was so afraid.
Know your child’s dosages and drugs. If you do go to the Emergency Room, drawing blood levels may be an important piece of information for the doctors involved in the treatment.
We wrote down all dosages on a calendar and used a pill organizer. There was no guessing about the medications that were taken. We also recorded how the dosages affected her. This information was used to convince the neurologist that she needed a different drug or combo. Do not count on your memory. Write it down.

 

SEIZUREMAMA